How to Contact An American Factory

Contacting a factory isn’t always easy. So, here are some tips to make sure your first message is perfect!

Ready to connect with the perfect factory who can take your designs to production? Before you take the leap and reach out to a potential manufacturer, check out these tips to make sure you make the most of your messages on Maker’s Row.

In a previous post, we laid out 5 common mistakes to avoid when messaging factories. With these “don’ts” in mind, now it’s time to check out some “do’s” to help you go forward in connecting with the right factory for you.

Be straightforward when introducing your company and what you’re looking to make

There’s no need to be mysterious about your brand or product when contacting a factory. If anything, it’s better for the factory to know you are and what your brand is to ensure that you are serious. However, do not go too in-depth. Just simply state the name of your brand, your main product, and what you’re looking to produce.

Hi Terry,

I am the owner of American Leather Goods Co., a small business in Brooklyn that manufacturers leather goods. I’m looking for a manufacturer that can make leather cuffs.

Include as much information up front about your product as possible

Gather all necessary documents you think the factory might need to produce your item. Useful items to have on hand include sketches, measurements, materials, colors, construction information and number of units needed.

Or better yet, organize your design info into a tech pack. Both you and your factory will be glad that you have organized all your ideas in one place where you can refer back to when needed.

Attached you will find my tech pack which includes the measurements, materials, colors, trim, hardware, grading, labels, tags, etc. I require for my leather cuffs. I am looking to produce 10,000 units.

Target the right factory for your needs.

Are you looking for a factory that can help with ideation? Or are you ready to head straight to production? The factories on our site list their capabilities, so you can easily figure out if a factory would be able to help you with specific stages of the production process:

I need assistance in the pattern-making process. Is this something your factory can provide?

Include your budget

I’m working with a budget of 8 dollars/ piece, coming out to $80,000 total. Does this budget seem feasible? I’ve attached my project for more details.

By being specific, direct, and organized, you can greatly increase your chances of quality interaction with a manufacturer.

Here is the full example of a great first message:

Hi Terry,

I am the owner of American Leather Goods Co., a small business in Brooklyn that manufacturers leather goods. I’m looking for a manufacturer that can make leather cuffs.

Attached you will find my tech pack which includes the measurements, materials, colors, trim, hardware, grading, labels, tags, etc. I require for my leather cuffs. I am looking to produce 10,000 units.

I need assistance in the pattern-making process. Is this something your factory can provide?

I’m working with a budget of 8 dollars/ piece, coming out to $80,000 total. Does this budget seem feasible? I’ve attached my project for full details.

Search thousands of American manufacturers here: makersrow.com/search. Good luck!


GET NOTIFIED WHEN WE POST A NEW ARTICLE!

* indicates required



  • Rocio E

    Stephanie, this is great advice that (unfortunately) keeps getting stashed under the more fun things to do (draw and marketing)… I’ve lost count of the number of people we get asking for price quotes based on nothing more than a vague description of the item they are still thinking of developing

  • Pingback: How To Send Orders to a Label Manufacturer | Maker’s Row Blog

  • Pingback: What Does A Factory Need To Know About You? | Maker’s Row Blog

  • Kenogi

    It’s a rather good template, and I agree that it is important to be not solely focused on price and quantity for the very first enquiry. However, I do not think that it is a good practice to tell the other party about your budget immediately, as it will leave not much room for negotiation later on. If the supplier’s original price is, say, $7, and you propose $8, they might just agree to the price of $8, and you will be paying extra without knowing it.